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In Defense of the Dark Arts

Changing attitudes in any generatiion starts at the top; politicians, the media and business people need to spread the message that creative thinkers are people we need in society. If not, our world will lose out on potential agents for the change it is crying out for. Inequality, war, environmental problems, health epidemics and recessions show no sign of ending, and obviously we need to look at new ways of doing things. With their skills in innovation, research and analytical thinking; arts students will be part of that solution – including me
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The Letter I’ll Never Send

As you know, I’m not the most eloquent of speakers to say the least, so I’ve decided I need to write down exactly what I’m thinking, so I don’t forget anything or put it off again. I’ve wanted to say what I’m thinking for ages but I keep putting it off because I’m scared, or … Continue reading

The Great Gatsby Through a Marxist Literary Criticism Lens

Gatsby has certainly worked hard in his life, and is more self-invented than any other character in the book. He knew from a young age that he wanted to be rich, and did whatever it took to achieve this. When he moved up from his ‘despicable’ previous work as a janitor, clam digger and salmon fisher to work for Dan Cody on his yacht, he is taking his first step up the rungs of classes. To Gatsby, Cody’s yacht ‘represented all the beauty and glamour in the world.’ He saw the class above him with rose-tinted glasses, as well as his love interest, Daisy, but neither of the two are as wonderful as he imagines them to be. No one in ‘The Great Gatsby’ is really happy in their class; they either want to become richer and move up a class, or if they are one of the few in the very top order, like Daisy, they see the ‘awfulness’ of everything. This lines up with the Marxist idea that life is a continuous struggle between the bourgeois and the proletariat . Continue reading